Monthly Archives: May 2017

I LOVE JAPAN ❤ 日本の今を伝えたい!- Capturing the surreal –

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As I mentioned in my introduction for English Avenue, one of my hobbies is photography.
As I got more into photography different aspects began to appeal to me more than others.
One particular aspect that I’ve become obsessed with is geometry in photography – either in the form of lines or symmetrical patterns.

Life’s Treadmill.

However, geometric photos alone can be a little boring – they need a human element to bring the photos to life and to give the photos a sense of scale.
Often just a lone figure is great but, occasionally, more than one depending on the scene.
Also, the combination of geometry and the human element give the photo a kind of surreal look – hence the title of this blog – Capturing the surreal.

The lunatics have taken over the asylum.

Around this time, one of my English students introduced me to the work of Giorgio De Chirico – an Italian artist whose art influenced the ‘Surrealists’ – a cultural movement that began in the 1920s.
I found his artwork to be both inspirational and beautiful and I wanted to try and create real life photos that were similar to some of his artwork.

The Mystery and Melancholy of a Street by Giorgio de Chirico.

I began searching Tokyo and the surrounding area for forms of geometry I could incorporate into my photography.
I’d often spend 30 mins to an hour before sleeping doing google searches or searching Pinterest for locations I could use.
I found some amazing locations – not only in Japan but around the world and started making lists of places to visit.
As I got more into geometric photography I also started to notice patterns and lines in my everyday environment that I hadn’t noticed before.

Stepping out of the shadows.

The one downside to this type of photography was the time I would sometimes have to wait for the right person to step into the frame.
Sometimes I’d go to a location and no one would be there to step into the frame, which was pretty frustrating.
Another aspect that I was keen to combine was shadows.
This provided another problem as it meant I was dependent on the right weather as well as the right time of day for the location to be in the light and not the shade.
However I did learn that a few locations would work just as well in the rain or just after the rain.
A further problem was being able to get the right vantage point (height) so that I could show the sense of scale – a problem I’m still dealing with regarding some locations.

Rain check

‘Capturing the surreal’ is an ongoing project for me and I’m really looking forward to being able to add some locations I’ve found further a field in Japan and abroad.

And, as a final note, if you have any geometric location recommendations please let me know.
I can be found on these links:

https://www.instagram.com/laurence__bouchard/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/drzzz/
https://www.facebook.com/laurencebouchard2015

*Below are a few more images:

Some lines have to be crossed.

Out on the tiles.

From a jack to a king.

Detour.

Life through bars.

Untitled.

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I LOVE JAPAN ❤ 日本の今を伝えたい!- Japan Should Change Its Traveling Ways –

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If you’re coming from another country, particularly the U.S., Japan is a relatively easy country to navigate.
Best of all, with the JR Rail Pass, it can be very affordable, which includes use of the bullet trains (shinkansen).
You can go wherever you want in Japan for just a few hundred dollars.

If you live in Japan, however, it’s another story.
Travel within Japan can be prohibitively expensive, even among foreign residents.
Of course, a big reason so many foreigners move to Japan is to explore it, so the irony of the situation should not be lost on anyone.

Such is the case with me.
I came to Japan for a number of reasons, one of which is to explore the country and to travel within it.
Despite being a resident of upwards of six years, I haven’t traveled anywhere beyond Osaka.
It’s just too expensive, and with not enough return on the investment, it’s difficult to justify the expense.

Visiting the likes of Hiroshima and Kyushu will likely have to wait until I return to Japan as a visitor from the U.S.
I can buy the JR Rail Pass then and go wherever I please.
It will sure be convenient, and I can finally explore Japan in the way I couldn’t when I actually lived here.

That doesn’t make a lot of sense, does it?
That’s why Japan should offer the same pass for its foreign residents who contribute their labor and tax money to the country.
We invest more of our time and money than any tourist.
We should enjoy the same benefits.